Sarah Pavis

recycledmoviecostumes:

While not exactly a recycled movie costume because of the fact that this beautiful piece was not originally created for use in film or on television (or stage for that matter)- this sensational necklace, and most importantly, the pearl at the end of it has been used several times in films.

But there is more wonderful history and re-use of this spectacular jewel than just in various films. The pearl and the necklace has a fabulous history that spans almost five hundred years!

The pearl attached to the marvelous necklace is called La Peregrina, which in Spanish means “The Pilgrim.” or “The Wanderer.” This pearl lives up to its name, having had many owners and traveled the continents, appearing first in paintings, a coin, and finally in film.

Originally the pearl weighed 223.8 grains, and upon its discovery around 1513 off of the Pearl Islands in the Gulf of Panama, was the largest pearl ever found.

The pearl was found, legend says, by a slave who was given his freedom upon its discovery. The pearl was put into the Spanish Crown Jewels during the reign of King Ferdinand V, or possibly Charles V, where it remained until Phillip II gave the pearl as a gift to Mary I in anticipation of their upcoming marriage in 1554. Mary is very often depicted wearing this prized jewel given to her by her husband. There is even the possibility that the pearl is depicted on coinage from Mary I’s reign.
After Queen Mary died, the Pearl was returned to Spain where it would remain for nearly 250 years. It was again part of the Spanish crown jewels, and the famous painter Velazquez painted the mother and wife of Phillip IV both wearing the famed pearl.
In 1808, Spain was captured by Napoleon, and he placed upon the throne his brother Joseph, who took possession of the pearl. When the French were defeated at the Battle of Vitoria, it is believed that Joseph actually carried the pearl upon his person while fleeing the city of Madrid.

From there, the Pearl was given into the hands of Charles Louis Napoleon, who eventually sold it to the 2nd Marquess of Abercorn, in whose family it would remain for some years.

On two occasions the pearl was very nearly lost by the wife of the Marquess. The first time was for a formal occasion at Buckingham Palace, when it was discovered missing from her necklace and was soon discovered having fallen on the train of another woman’s gown. The second time it went missing was at Windsor Castle, where it was eventually found on a sofa.

In 1969 the pearl was put up for Auction at Sotheby’s in London, where it was purchased for $37,000 by Richard Burton for his wife Elizabeth Taylor. Burton lavished jewels on Elizabeth, but especially enjoyed pieces with historical significance.

Not long after the purchase, the pearl went missing again, much to the horror of Elizabeth, who concealed its disappearance from her husband. After a quick search, she soon found the pearl in the mouth of one of her dogs - thankfully, the pearl was not damaged.

That same year, Elizabeth would wear the pearl for her small, unbilled role as a courtier in Anne of the Thousand Days, where it appears on a small platinum strand with several smaller pearls spaced throughout. Not long after this time, both Elizabeth and Richard agreed that the pearl needed a more secure and magnificent setting, and so it was given over to Cartier to create a fantastic necklace that would properly display the jewel.

The result was a glittering confection of diamonds and rubies, which Elizabeth later wore in Divorce His - Divorce Hers in 1973 and then again in 1977 in A Little Night Music.

The La Peregrina was then on display at the Cartier Boutique in Beverly Hills, on loan from Elizabeth Taylor for the 100th anniversary of Cartier in America. When Elizabeth Taylor passed away her jewelry was auctioned off at Christie’s. The necklace, expected to sell for two to three million dollars, wound up fetching a record 11.8 million.

To learn more about the history of this fantastic pearl, go here. Or for it’s later history in the hands of Elizabeth Taylor, where it appeared in three films, read Elizabeth Taylor’s My Love Affair With Jewelry.

Costume Credit: Katie S.

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(Source: recycledmoviecostumes.com)

Bedframe Mountable Glasses Holder

I don’t think I’m unusual among eyeglass wearers in that I always want my glasses near at hand when I’m in bed.

Nightstands are the normal place eye glasses like to live but if you have a cat who likes to knock things off your nightstand (me, now) or are on the top bunk of a bunk bed (me, in college) or are the inside person in a couple who has their bed in the corner of the room (me, eventually?) a nightstand isn’t an option.

In college I kept my glasses in a zippered camping case that I kept clipped to my bedframe with string. Functional but janky. I figured I could do a little better now.

I love Sugru. It’s like Play-Doh for adults. It’s a moldable silicone that adheres to almost anything which you have 30 minutes to get in whatever shape you want before it starts to set, then it air cures for 24 hours and functions just like any other rubber.

I was originally thinking I’d make the whole prototype out of sugru. It’s very adhesive so I figured it’d pick a spot on my bedframe and mold it on there and then scrape it off whenever I moved next. But to save myself some material (sugru is kinda pricy) and make it remountable, I picked up some 3M Command hooks and strips and used the hook as a base for the sugru.

I wear a few pairs of glasses with very different shapes so I made sure to mold it so that it’d snuggly hold all of them. I made the lip that holds the glasses arms pretty thick because with sugru thick pieces are fairly rigid and thin pieces are fairly flexible. I wanted to make sure the lip that holds the glasses arms wouldn’t bend if I roughly grabbed for my glasses in the middle of the night. 

I’ve worked with sugru before to repair or tweak things so I was familiar with how it cured and set but this is one of the first where I’ve made something completly new with it. 

It holds all my glasses pretty well and I’m really pleased with how it came out. 

Unlike my other tinkering projects—which I don’t post about/do nearly often enough—this one is borderline marketable. (I’m actually working on another project which is very marketable so I’m not going to post about that one for awhile yet.)

Its borderline marketability got me wondering if this product already exists. Short answer: Yes. Long answer: Not in the same form. I don’t know if I’m not googling the right terms but I can only find two similar products and they’re ugly and cumbersome. Who wants giant gross noses on their wall? Eegh. The slim profile of my design makes it ideal for keeping bedside. 

If I wanted to make this into a product the next step would probably be measuring the curves of the nose ridge and making a 3D printed prototype. I’ve got access to a coordinate measuring machine at work so I could probably get the dimensions of the part without too much problem. Then it’d be a case of normalizing the curves in CAD, sending it off to Shapeways or somewhere similar, and seeing if the printed part held the glasses as snugly. From there I’d iterate til it looks and works like something commercial, then sell one-offs through Shapeways.

Do you wear glasses? Do you want one of these? Lemme know. I’m debating taking the next steps to produce it. 

I just made it the night before last (cured yesterday) so I haven’t mounted it yet. I’m debating between the bedframe and the wall next to the bed. Trying to figure out where I’ll be least likely to knock my glasses over accidentally and the cat will be least likely to knock them over on purpose. I may need to do a 2.0 version where the lip curves back around to hold the arms in place. More tinkering. Always more tinkering. 

Filed under tinkering

ryannorth:

In 2010, David (Wondermark), Matt (all the stories) and I (Adventure Time, To Be or Not To Be, Dinosaur Comics) put out a book called “Machine Of Death”! It was a crowdsourced collection of short stories written by a bunch of awesome people we’d never met, all based on the same premise originally proposed by T-Rex: what if there was a machine that could tell, from just a sample of your blood, you how you were going to die? It was a crazy book that nobody wanted to publish, so after a few years of trying we just straight-up published it ourselves.

The book became the #1 bestselling book on Amazon.com the day it launched. It ended up on a bunch of “best books of the year” lists. It was a super awesome story!

In one week we’ll be launching the sequel, called This Is How You Die. It’s going to be great: legit better in every way, with tons of awesome stories in a variety of genres (YES there is a choose-your-own-path Machine of Death story, OF COURSE there is). We went through almost 2000 submissions to select the 31 stories in this book. We’re all SUPER proud of it. But what can you do to top becoming the #1 bestselling book on Amazon?

You try to make every one of authors in the book a New York Times Bestselling Author, by getting the book on the NYT bestsellers list.

This will be especially awesome since, like the first volume, this will be the first publishing credit for most of the authors in the book. We honestly don’t know if this idea is possible. But we know it’s possible to try.

Every sale from today onwards counts towards our NYT status. If this book sounds at all interesting, and you think you might like reading inventive and memorable stories curated by a dude whose comics you maybe like, then why not head over to Amazon.com (or .ca or .co.uk) and get the book? They’ve got it on sale for 30% off retail.

This book is gonna be insane. I can’t wait for you to read it! And check out thisishowyoudie.com for more information, including some free stories from the book and a SWEET VIDEO :o

heyyyy that book i’m being published in comes out NEXT WEEK. holy crap! 

if you like me you’ll preorder a copy
if you love me you’ll preorder two copies
if you want to propose marriage i’ll give you my address so you can mail me a case of them

One Simple Trick For Tightening Your Glasses: Post-Its
I recently bought my first pair of acetate glasses which I love the look of, but hate the fit. After years of wearing metal glasses with bendable arms and adjustable nosepads, I can’t seem to get used to the loose, imprecise way acetate glasses fit. Since I bought the glasses online I knew a glasses shop wouldn’t be eager to adjust them for me so I resorted to a little hacky fix to get the arms to fit more snugly. 
Putting a couple of pieces of 0.004 inch thin, tacky post-it paper on the mating surfaces of the frame and arms translates into about 5-10° of opening between the arms and frame which in turn translates into ear-to-ear gap about ⅛-½ inches smaller.
Doesn’t seem like much, but when it comes to glasses fit, it’s the difference between loose and snug. If you need them tighter then add another little square of post-it paper, if you need less, remove one. (I have two on each side, one on each surface.) I’ve washed my glasses and gotten caught in the rain and the post-its haven’t fallen off yet. 
I added post-it paper to the slippery plastic nose rests this morning to help keep the glasses from sliding down my face. So far that’s working really well too! But I may not keep it. I haven’t attached a photo of it because the nose post-its are juuuuust visible enough when I’m wearing my glasses that I fear it takes me into “dweeb with electrical tape on the frame” territory. Sort of defeats the point of buying cool kid Warby Parker glasses.

One Simple Trick For Tightening Your Glasses: Post-Its

I recently bought my first pair of acetate glasses which I love the look of, but hate the fit. After years of wearing metal glasses with bendable arms and adjustable nosepads, I can’t seem to get used to the loose, imprecise way acetate glasses fit. Since I bought the glasses online I knew a glasses shop wouldn’t be eager to adjust them for me so I resorted to a little hacky fix to get the arms to fit more snugly

Putting a couple of pieces of 0.004 inch thin, tacky post-it paper on the mating surfaces of the frame and arms translates into about 5-10° of opening between the arms and frame which in turn translates into ear-to-ear gap about ⅛-½ inches smaller.

Doesn’t seem like much, but when it comes to glasses fit, it’s the difference between loose and snug. If you need them tighter then add another little square of post-it paper, if you need less, remove one. (I have two on each side, one on each surface.) I’ve washed my glasses and gotten caught in the rain and the post-its haven’t fallen off yet. 

I added post-it paper to the slippery plastic nose rests this morning to help keep the glasses from sliding down my face. So far that’s working really well too! But I may not keep it. I haven’t attached a photo of it because the nose post-its are juuuuust visible enough when I’m wearing my glasses that I fear it takes me into “dweeb with electrical tape on the frame” territory. Sort of defeats the point of buying cool kid Warby Parker glasses.

Filed under tinkering

Skateboard Tape For a Grippier, More Distinctive Phone
I love my Nexus 4 but I hate the glass back. It’s too slippery; I’m afraid it’s going to shatter if I drop it and I don’t know which is the front or the back when I’m digging around in my purse. So I solved all those problems and more with a little skateboard tape.
To start, I bought a cheap $10 white plastic case off Amazon. It’s thin and fits snugly to the phone. The phone is already larger than I’d like so I really wanted to keep bulk down. Unfortunately the case, while better than glass, was still slipperier than I’d like.
Skateboard tape is great because it’s cheap, colorful, and grippy. I cut it into a chevron for a few reasons. Namely, it’s the easiest way, with a single symmetrical piece, to maximize the area of the phone I covered: from the top near the camera lens where my index finger rests and the bottom corner where my pinky rests. It also lets me know when I’m feeling around in my jacket pocket or purse which way the phone is orriented, it’s like an arrow pointing toward the top. But of course the most importnat reason I used a chevron is because it looks cool.
Since it’s made to grip shoes, skateboard tape is a bit too abrasive for hands, so I covered it in a thin layer of clear nail polish. Enough so that the tape didn’t bite into my hands but not so much that it defeats the point of having grippy tape. The tape is thin and very adhesive so even comign in and out of my pocket it’s not peeling. And if it does, a drop more of nail polish or super glue should take care of it.
Plus it looks cool and distinctive. No one is ever going to pick up my phone by mistake at a bar and think it’s theirs.

Skateboard Tape For a Grippier, More Distinctive Phone

I love my Nexus 4 but I hate the glass back. It’s too slippery; I’m afraid it’s going to shatter if I drop it and I don’t know which is the front or the back when I’m digging around in my purse. So I solved all those problems and more with a little skateboard tape.

To start, I bought a cheap $10 white plastic case off Amazon. It’s thin and fits snugly to the phone. The phone is already larger than I’d like so I really wanted to keep bulk down. Unfortunately the case, while better than glass, was still slipperier than I’d like.

Skateboard tape is great because it’s cheap, colorful, and grippy. I cut it into a chevron for a few reasons. Namely, it’s the easiest way, with a single symmetrical piece, to maximize the area of the phone I covered: from the top near the camera lens where my index finger rests and the bottom corner where my pinky rests. It also lets me know when I’m feeling around in my jacket pocket or purse which way the phone is orriented, it’s like an arrow pointing toward the top. But of course the most importnat reason I used a chevron is because it looks cool.

Since it’s made to grip shoes, skateboard tape is a bit too abrasive for hands, so I covered it in a thin layer of clear nail polish. Enough so that the tape didn’t bite into my hands but not so much that it defeats the point of having grippy tape. The tape is thin and very adhesive so even comign in and out of my pocket it’s not peeling. And if it does, a drop more of nail polish or super glue should take care of it.

Plus it looks cool and distinctive. No one is ever going to pick up my phone by mistake at a bar and think it’s theirs.

Filed under tinkering