Sarah Pavis

Posts tagged greader

The Beautiful Illustrations That Made Poe’s Stories Terrifying In 1919

↪ from Co.Design

When Poe’s 1908 collection of short stories, Tales of Mystery and Imagination, was reprinted in 1919, a copy of the “deluxe” edition would cost you 5 guineas (in today’s money, that’s about 300 USA Fun Tickets).

The book was printed on handmade paper, bound in vellum and lettered in gold. But its cost was mainly due to new illustrations: 24 full-page drawings by young Irish illustrator Harry Clarke, whose ink illustrations brought Poe’s characters to life with mesmerizing detail. Each copy was signed by Clarke, and according to rare book sellers, the edition topped Christmas lists in 1919.

The popularity of Clarke’s edition feel foreign to us today; DVD box sets have long since eclipsed books as the favored medium through which to consume spooky stories. But as some who owned the book as children have noted, there was something meditative about being able to study a single image indefinitely, returning to it with every reading. These drawings invite dissection by the reader, something popular images rarely ask of us today.

Despite being known mainly for his illustration work today, these drawings were simply a side project for Clarke, who trained with his dad as a stained glass artist before being swept up in the Arts & Crafts movement. He died early of tuberculosis, but his work remains in churches and homes throughout Ireland.

[Thanks to 50Watts for permission to use these scans, which came from an expanded 1923 Edition of the book.]

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John Cleese vs The Sun

↪ from Letters of Note



In 1982, British tabloid The Sun reported that filming on Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life had been marred by an incident involving John Cleese and a group of extras dressed as Zulu warriors. According to the article (image here), Cleese, frustrated that bad weather was slowing the shoot, had ”leaped about among the extras demanding ‘Which one of you bastards did a rain dance?’”

Cleese’s reaction to the story can be seen below, in the form of a fruitless chain of correspondence between him and the newspaper’s editor, Kenneth Donlan. He later reported the incident to the Press Council; they agreed and his complaint was upheld. Cleese also kept to his word and reprinted the letters in the book of the film.

(Source: Monty Python’s The Meaning Of Life; Image: John Cleese, via.)

August 1982

The Editor
The Sun
30 Bouverie Street
London EC4

Dear Sir,

I am afraid I have to write to you again to complain! I hope this will not become a habit.

You wrote a story on Friday about a rather funny situation that arose during the Monty Python filming in Scotland last week which you got pretty right.

However, in paragraph 3 from the end of the story, you say “And long-legged Cleese leaped about among the extras demanding, ‘Which one of you bastards did a rain dance?’”

Now this is a total invention of your writer. I never mentioned the words “rain dance” nor did the thought cross my mind. Neither did I “leap about”, nor refer to the extras as “bastards”.

So, the first grounds for my complaint are that the paragraph is completely untrue. The second ground for complaint is that, in the UK where there are racial tensions, it does not help my career to have attributed to me a remark which a lot of people would feel was racialist.

I know what happened. I am a zany madcap comic, and your writer thought of the joke and decided to attribute it to me. It may be a minor matter but I do think is is quite unprofessional.

I do hope you agree.

Yours faithfully,

John Cleese

——————————

August 23rd, 1982

Mr John Cleese
[Redacted]
London W11

Dear Mr. Cleese,

I am sorry that it has been necessary for you to write to us complaining about one of our news stories.

I have made enquiries with the correspondent concerned. He says that he reported the remarks accurately and in their proper context. The reporter adds: “The remarks were not attributed to any racial group whatsoever and were generally in a voice of frustration.” I hope that this observation helps to clear up any impression that this story put a racist slant on your comment. This was in no way the case and everyone in this office is constantly reminded of the necessity to avoid any hurt to any section of the community, particularly minorities.

With every good wish to you and all who make Monty Python.

Yours sincerely,

Kenneth Donlan
Managing Editor

——————————

7 September 1982

Kenneth Donlan
Managing Editor
The Sun
Fleet Street
London EC4

Dear Mr. Donlan,

Thank you very much for your very kind and understanding letter.

I think somewhere along the line you may have missed the point of my letter, which was not that the remarks were inaccurately reported, or that they were not in their proper context, but that I did not make them at all!!!

However, I am sure that your correspondent is implying that I did. So I have a little suggestion.

Whether or not I made these remarks can be established because there were so many witnesses around, all of whom spent the day within a few yards of me.

So why don’t we have a little sporting bet? I always think of The Sun as a fun newspaper with a bit of a weakness for a jolly wager like this. (Maybe we could even make a little “news” story out of it. “The Ministry of Silly Walks vs The Editor of The Sun” or “The Sun’s Fawlty Statement”.)

Anyway, what I suggest is that if your correspondent can show that I made the remark I should pay a sum to the charity of your choice. However, if the witnesses establish that the first they heard of the comment was when somebody read it in The Sun the next morning, then The Sun should pay a sum towards Cancer Research, specifically the charity run by my friend Rob Buckman. I have told him about this idea and he is rather excited.

I do hope you will agree. I don’t know what sort of sum would be appropriate, but how about £10,000?

With very best wishes,

John Cleese

——————————

29th September, 1982

John Cleese, Esq.,
[Redacted]
London W11

Dear Mr. Cleese,

I regret the delay in answering your letter which I found on my return from holiday. Your suggestion for a contest certainly has merit but is not really practicable.

Our correspondent still claims that the words were said as he reported them, and you insist that you were not the speaker. The young man is reliable and there seems no chance of reconciliation. His reporting has not been under fire previously.

The remarks were reported to voice the frustration which the weather was causing.

Perhaps you will let me know of any other original ideas that might help us to come to an amicable solution.

Best wishes,

Kenneth Donlan
Managing Editor

——————————

6 October 1982

Kenneth Donlan
Managing Editor
The Sun
Fleet Street
London EC4

Dear Mr. Donlan,

Thank you for your letter.

Chicken!

You ask me for another idea to resolve the problem. Well the problem is, put bluntly, that your correspondent is lying through his teeth (extremely uncomfortable position).

Now, as I have said, I have sixty odd witnesses. How can I use them to convince you? Shall I ask them to write individually, or would a list of signatures on one letter suffice?

I do hope, like you, that we can settle this amicably.

Best wishes,

John Cleese

PS I hope you have no objection to our including this correspondence in the Monty Python book of the film.

PPS A correspondent of mine tells me you were recently seen running stark naked down Fleet Street shouting “Enoch Powell has a glass leg”. Is my correspondent by any chance distorting the facts?

——————————

14th October, 1982

John Cleese, Esq.,
[Redacted]
London W11

Dear Mr. Cleese,

Thank you for your letter of 6th October, 1982.

Our correspondent sticks to his version of events and I feel that there is now no more for me to contribute to our exchange of views.

I must add that we do not wish this correspondence to be included in the Monty Python book of the film.

With all good wishes.

Yours sincerely,

Kenneth Donlan
Managing Editor

——————————

20 October 1982

Kenneth Donlan Esq
Managing Editor
The Sun
Fleet Street
London EC4

Dear Mr. Donlan,

Thank you for your letter of 14 October.

I am sorry you feel you have no more to contribute to our “exchange of views”.

What you could have contributed is to have listened to my witnesses. But for some reason this never for a moment interested you. Ah well…

Now I should remind you that your “view” has been printed in your newspaper, and my “view” has not (not much of an “exchange” really).

And yet, now, you don’t want me to print my version.

Mr Donlan, what about the freedom of the press? Or is it only your press that is free, and not mine?

Is it equitable that you should print what I didn’t say, while trying to stop me printing what you did say?

Does it occur to you that this could not possibly be a moral position?

I feel, however, that this kind of gentle chiding will get me nowhere. My faith in the professional standards of the popular press is again shaken.

So I am afraid I shall have to pursue some other avenue.

Yours disappointedly,

John Cleese


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How recruiters look at your resume

↪ from FlowingData

Recruiters looking at resumes

In a study by TheLadders (of n equals 30), recruiters looked at resumes and make some judgments. During evaluations, eye tracking software was employed, and they found that the recruiters spent about six seconds on a resume looking for six main things: name, current company and title, previous company and title, previous position start and end dates, current position start and end dates, and education. After that, it was a crapshoot.

Beyond these six data points, recruiters did little more than scan for keywords to match the open position, which amounted to a very cursory “pattern matching” activity. Because decisions were based mostly on the six pieces of data listed above, an individual resume’s detail and explanatory copy became filler and had little to no impact on the initial decision making. In fact, the study’s eye tracking technology shows that recruiters spent about 6 seconds on their initial “fit/no fit” decision.

If I ever have to submit a resume, I’m just going to put those six things as bullets and then the rest will all be keywords in small, light print. It’ll be like job search SEO.

Update: I’ve been told that TheLadder’s reputation might be less than savory, and a quick search shows some in agreement, so it might be wise to sidestep the service. Instead, go with my awesome six-bullet advice and you’re gold.

[via @alexlundry]

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How science failed during the Gulf oil disaster

↪ from Ars Technica

When the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig exploded two years ago in the Gulf of Mexico, many scientists, including me, stepped outside of the Ivory Tower to study what was an unprecedented—and unintended—environmental experiment. We succeeded in gathering mountains of data, learning all sorts of new things, and advancing science.

But we also failed.

Academic scientists chose the research that most interested us, rather than what may have been most important to responding to the immediate disaster. We failed to grasp the mechanics of the media. And we struggled with how our data was vetted and whom we could trust with it. Simply put, problems arose when academia did not appreciate the cultures of the other players responding to the spill.

To add to these challenges, we were very much in the fog of war, literally and figuratively. The smell of oil, floating in a sea of orange/brown oil, the roaring jets of burning oil, and the hundreds of boats was overwhelming. And on land, the press just kept calling.

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Loose Lips

↪ from The Paris Review

It is perfectly monstrous the way people go about, nowadays, saying things against one behind one’s back that are absolutely and entirely true.

—Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

I spent a recent Sunday morning at the baby shower of a friend made in adulthood. The other attendees all went back to Catholic school, so after the obligatory oohing and aahing over the onesies, conversation turned to Jessie, the surprising no-show of the high school crowd. “She must be hungover again,” said one girl with a knowing shrug.

“Yeah,” another chimed in. “Scott must’ve been on the late shift again, if you know what I mean.”

Snickering all around. “Ugh, Scott,” one said with a theatrical shiver. “That guy is such a loser, my God. If Jessie doesn’t move on soon—”

“Jessie will never move on,” another girl emphatically interrupted. “She finds his gigantic forty-year-old beer belly and pathological fear of commitment totally entrancing, and really who wouldn’t?”

What followed was another ten minutes on the subject of the absent Jessie, who, at thirty-three, all agreed, was definitely way too old to keep answering the midnight booty calls of the ne’er-do-well weeknight bartender at the Harp. Finally, the hostess noticed me nibbling quietly on my teacakes in the corner. “Oh, God, I am so sorry!” she cried. “I forgot that you don’t know Jessie! This must be so boring to you—we will change the subject.” A pause. “So, um, what else should we talk about?” She gazed down at her belly doubtfully.

In the thudding silence that followed, I was allowed to insist that Jessie’s sleazy sexual predilections and Scott’s ironic collection of too-tight NASCAR T-shirts were infinitely more interesting than bump-circumference guessing games or the extortionate price of strollers these days. Several hours past the official end of the party, I left in the glow of new friendships made: it was truly the most fun I’d had in weeks.

Because that’s the thing: gossip is fun, one of the most profound and satisfying pleasures we humans are given. Read More »

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tit-for-tat

↪ from Fake Etymologies

tit-for-tat, adj. /ˌtit-fər-ˈtat/

Juvenile pronunciation (commonly called babyspeak) for the phrase “this for that,” used to teach children the rudiments of sharing.

The unprintable—but nevertheless widely printed—story about breasts and body art is an ex post facto justification invented by a New Orleans tattoo artist to drum up business around Mardi Gras.

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Adafruit's “Internet of Things” Printer

↪ from adafruit industries blog

Window-101

NEW PRODUCT – Adafruit IoT Printer Project Pack “Internet of Things” printer. Build an “Internet of Things” connected mini printer that will do your bidding! This is a fun weekend project that comes with a beautiful laser cut case. Once assembled, the little printer connects to Ethernet to get Internet data for printing onto 2 1/4″ wide receipt paper. The example sketch we’ve written will connect to Twitter’s search API and retrieve and print tweets according to your requests: you can have it print out tweets from a person, a hashtag, mentioning a word, etc! Once you’ve gotten that working, you can of course easily adapt our sketch to customize the printer.

The project is not very difficult but does require some light soldering, so you’ll want to have a little experience with a soldering iron. You’ll also need a small flathead screwdriver to assemble the box. It’s also best if you’ve had a little Arduino experience so you can feel comfortable downloading the IDE and uploading our example sketch.

Contains:

Kit-Parts

This pack does not contain an Arduino+Arduino Ethernet Shield, Arduino Ethernet or Ethernet cable To complete the project you will need to add either an Arduino + Ethernet Shield or an Arduino UNO Ethernet. If you’re using an Arduino UNO Ethernet you will also need an FTDI friend or FTDI cable to upload the sketch. A plain straight-thru Ethernet cable is also required (any length)

Before purchasing, please check out the full tutorial with images, code, etc!

In stock and tweeting now!

Now you don’t have to wait for BERG’s Little Printer, you can buy Adafruit’s little printer kit today.

Filed under greader little printer

NEW in SCIENCE (Nov, 1950)

↪ from Modern Mechanix

Sadly, the University of Chicago no longer offers a B.S. in Monkey Railroad Engineering.

NEW in SCIENCE

Airborne Teletypewriter, securely latched to this paratrooper, will jump with him when he hits the silk from a C-82 transport plane. Safely landed in the field of combat, he can quickly set it up and type out messages that will go over radio or wire circuits carrying front information to headquarters. The new lightweight teletypewriter is one of many new items being perfected to make our army world’s best.

Ape Engineer Ling Wong is a baby orangutan at Lincoln Park Zoo, Chicago. Placidly wearing an engineer’s cap, gloves and goggles, Ling squats on the Diesel engine of the “Zoo Line,” the kids’ own train, and it would be hard to say who’s having the most fun. Ling used to work for the Chimpanzeelvania Line.

Hope for the Seasick lies in this stabilizing fin, jutting out from – the side of the liner Chusan, moored at Liverpool, England. The gyroscopically controlled fins, one on each side, are designed to resist excessive rolling of the ship and thus to banish those green complexions. The fins can retract into the hull.

Jumbo Sambo chugs along at a lively 27 mph. as he gives these lucky kids a ride. The realistic robot elephant is 8 ft. tall, 12 ft. long and is made from 9000 different parts. Without his toughened paper “hide” he reveals a big steel frame and connecting rods that link the 10-hp. engine to the rubber-wheel feet. The inventor, Frank Stuart of Thaxted, England, says parks in the U.S. may soon purchase copies of his pet.

Tiny Transceiver is an experimental radio set that transmits and receives messages within 200 yds., weighs only 11 ounces and fits into a king-sized cigarette pack. It’s complete, including power supply, and features up-to-date plug-in units that can be replaced if any of the parts fail, facilitating repairs.

Pattern of Sound Waves photographed by a new technique, is here shown by F. K. Harvey, a Bell Laboratory scientist. The visual wave pattern is produced by a scanning process similar to that used in television. A 110-volt neon tube supplies the light. Here Harvey demonstrates the focusing effect of a “sound lens.”

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